Weekend doujinshi review, 15/4/19

Welcome back to the wildly irregularly scheduled Weekend doujinshi review!

After a look at a slightly disturbing book last week, I am back to more all-ages appropriate fare this week, as usual firmly rooted in the sci-fi/fantasy category.

Kimi no Hanazono (Your flower garden) by Kotaro Yuki (duke)

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I covered a book by the same author in my Halloween post last year, which was a tale of giant monsters.. The style is so different I didn’t connect them at first (which is funny considering I bought this one directly from him).

A young girl walks the wasteland of a post-apocalyptic future, accompanied by a crude spider-like robot she calls “Maruzo” (maru means round, and zo is a suffix common to traditional male names, so the robot is basically called round guy). What they are looking for is not explicitly mentioned, but it is obvious that Maruzo has a different idea about it than his companion, when he tries to bring home a filthy old toy he found along the road, and she makes him put it back.
Back at home, they turn to watching old films, and the girl expresses her confusion at the actors’s emotional facial expressions. The world has become such an empty place that she has no concept of human emotion.

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Inside their little home, Maruzo has taken to fashioning flowers out of scrap metal, and they have even managed to plant a small patch of real flowers in their front yard, a rare thing as real vegetation is scarce in their barren environment. We learn that this is the result of a war of unprecedented scale, which ended up decimating the human population along with the Flora.
In search of other survivors, the girl and Maruzo decide to check out a distant city they see on the horizon.
The girl is overjoyed when she hears a voice, but it turns out to be a display board rerunning news broadcasts from the war: A new robot weapon, “T.A.K.O.” is being introduced to deal with dissidents against government policyno way that’s going to backfire, right?

When our protagonists take a wrong turn (against Maruzo’s instincts), they are ambushed by the very same robot weapon, which promptly aims for the girland Maruzo takes the shot for her.

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But T.A.K.O. (Japanese for octopus) isn’t done yet, and life takes a serious downturn for the protagonists.
But when all is said and done, they are able to turn the situation around, and end the book on an up noteand a wide field of flowers that has expanded well beyond the front yard.

I feel that the biggest appeal of Kimi no Hanazono – apart from the beautiful artis the characterizations of the protagonists. Contrary to stereotype, it is the girl who is emotionless and practical, while Maruzo builds scrap flowers, cherishes stuffed toys, and faints when a bug lands on him. Even so, there is a strong connection between the two, and when things look hopeless for Maruzo, the girl finally learns what the tears she saw in the old movie really meant.

Kimi no Hanazono is 38 story pages, framed by a beautiful, matte wraparound cover (the whole illustration can be found on the artist’s pixiv page). There is a light grey, textured cover sheet next to the inside cover, which does not wrap around anywhere. Little details like this are a testament to the artist’s investment in the project. In the afterword, artist Kotaro Yuki explains that the characters first appeared in a single illustration he did 2 years ago, and he ended up getting more and more attached to them as he drew them more. He started seeing something of himself in the character of Maruzo, and decided to draw a comic featuring them. It’s great to see when characters develop a life of their own like that, and the love for them shows in the pages of Kimi no Hanazono.

The artist: Kotaro Yuki on twitter, pixiv.

Hope you enjoyed the read.In for more? Make sure to check the doujinshi tag for books I have previously reviewed.

As always, I welcome feedback and interaction, so I’d be happy if you liked/reblogged, or even commented. Questions and suggestions are welcome!

Special Halloween Edition Doujinshi Review

I know, I know. I’m late to the party. Halloween is not usually a big thing for me, since I’m from central Europe. But I made a trip to Roppongi on Friday to see the lifesized Patlabor Ingram (which was super cool, but unfortunately already getting prepped for transport and I didn’t get a good look at it), and the streets were flooded with people in flashy Halloween costumes, so it gave me an idea. Why not do a Halloween-themed doujinshi review?

So I made a short trip to Melonbooks and Lashinbang in Omiya yesterday to specifically look for books with Halloween-ish content. I expected to find a lot of cute witches, ghosts, and possibly some horror content, although I wasn’t sure whether the big stores would be stocking the heavy stuff.
But lo and behold, the first thing I found was this:

IMG_20141103_00011. Kuwareru (being devoured) by Nagomiyasan (Suzuki Nago)

Kuwareru‘s protagonist is a regular Joe, down on his luck: on the very first page, his wife files for divorce, and her lawyer reads him the conditions for meeting their adorable daughter Yukari.
A few days later, he is spending some time with Yukari, and we get the feeling that her innocent smile just might be his salvation, when suddenly he passes out and awakes to…

IMG_20141103_0003Chained to the wall in a barren room, the protagonist finds himself face to face with a huge, savage-looking monster that looks like straight out of Attack on Titan.
Both of them are bound by chained linked to the wall by a timed lock, the last one holding the monster down being set to 15 minutes earlier than the protagonist’s. Next to where he’s sitting, he finds a rusty knife, and binoculars, while the beast on the other end seems to be surrounded by human body parts from multiple victims.

He remembers a similar scene in a horror film, where the main character ended up cutting off their own foot to survive, but quickly dismisses the idea since the knife doesn’t look nearly sharp or strong enough to amputate anything… So he does the understandable thing: He freaks the fuck out.

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Only afterwards does he remember that he was with his little daughter when he was apparently abducted… And things only go downhill from there.

Kuwareru is a classic locked room horror story, and while there is some gore in it, the main scare element is definitely psychological. The main character faces the realization that his life is over, not only because he is about to be dismembered by a hulking monstrosity with gigantic fangs, but because he has already lost everything – his career is stagnating, his wife dumped him, and his dearest daughter may well be dead already. It’s a no-way-out situation, and this being a Japanese story, it is safer not to hold your breath for a happy ending…

Kuwareru  is 28 pages in B5 format, with a matte 4-color cover (probably the scariest I’ve ever seen on a doujinshi). It’s a pretty standard production physically, and definitely more about the story than visuals. The art is reasonably professional, and purposefully comes apart at times when the protagonist loses it.
The original price was 400 Yen, I got it at Melon Books for 549.

The author: Suzuki Nago on Pixiv, Twitter
Kuwareru on Melonbooks

Surprisingly, I didn’t find anything else appropriate for the theme at Melonbooks. So I moved on to Lashinbang, which sells second hand doujinshi and character goods.
And there, at the opposite end of the Halloween doujinshi spectrum, I found:

2. Potoneko Halloween by Naru Nanao & KOKONOBI (circle: Ice & Choco)

IMG_20141103_0006Okay, this is something that would normally never pick up, but it was the only book I could find that actually said “Halloween” on the cover, so I just had to get it.

Poteneko Halloween is a book from 2002, and unlike the other books I have been introducing, it’s simply a collection of illustrations rather than a manga story. According to the introduction, the artists had produced a variety of goods to go with it, such as a clear file (a plastic sleeve/folder to protect loose sheets of paper) and a decorative plate.

The 6-page insides of the book are fairly similar to the cover: There is one illustration per page, with a small block of text describing the artist’s motivations for producing the respective images.

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From what I can find on the web Naru Nanao is a fairly well known games illustrator, and Kokonobi a frequent collaborator (and former assistant?). The book is full color, and printed on pretty thick stock. It was 100 Yen at Lashinbang, I assume that’s because there’s not too much content and it’s fairly old.
There’s a lot of Kancolle illustration on Kokonobi’s Pixiv profile, including one for this year’s Halloween:

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halloween! by ここのび on pixiv

The artists:

Naru Nanao on Wikipedia

Kokonobi on Pixiv, Circle profile

And finally…

3. Kaijuu Wakusei (Monster Planet) by duke

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What would Halloween be without a good Kaijuu movie?

The story is set on a distant planet inhabited by peaceful creatures. Humans invade, and start harvesting the “Kaijuu” as material for weapons and armor. When one of the beasts, a sort of plant-dragon, being herded into town for slaughter, fights back, it’s put into chains and thrown into a dungeon.

There, it encounters a young girl, who has been imprisoned for living together peacefully with the monsters.

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Soon, she is taken back outside to be crucified publicly.. Until the plant-dragon bursts out of the ground from underneath and starts attacking the soldiers torturing the girl.
The soldiers being powerless against the monster, the town’s “king” shows his true colors: He’s a Kaijuu himself, having feasted on the monsters for years.

From there on, it’s an honest-to-god monster brawl, in the vein of the best of the Godzilla movies.

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Since I got this book at Lashinbang, I didn’t get to look at the insides, and half expected it to be a collection of Kaijuu illustrations. Very pleasantly surprised that it was a proper manga, with great art and a good story. Very satisfying conclusion, too.

Monster Planet is a 44-page story in B5 format, square bound with a semi-glossy 4c wraparound cover. It was 300 Yen at Lashinbang, and well worth it I think!

The artist: duke on Pixiv, Twitter

edit: Forgot one! Here is another “illustration collection” type book by artist kr3:

4. kr+4 by kr3 (Shibano Kaito)

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A beautiful collection of witch-themed illustrations. The artist points out on the first page that he loves drawing witches, which have a fairly defined general theme. The book features 7 illustrations, including the cover, each covering a different color or element.

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There’s no text or anything, but the illustrations are gorgeous, so I feel it was a steal at 100 Yen.

The artist: Shibano Kaito on the web

That’s it for today! Hope you enjoyed this look at a few books a little different from what I usually read. Want more? Make sure to check the doujinshi tag for books I have previously reviewed.

As always, I welcome feedback and interaction, so I’d be happy if you liked/reblogged, or even commented. Questions and suggestions are welcome!