International Manga Festival 2014 & Publishing a doujinshi in Japan

As I mentioned last week, I helped out my friend Philip Tan in getting a book printed in time for International Manga Festival. I figured it might be interesting for doujinshi fans or aspiring creators to hear how it happened, so here’s a little writeup.

With thousands of publications being printed and sold, Comic Market and similar events are big business for printing agencies, and several of them have specialized in this type of book. There’s plenty of on-demand printers that will get the book to you within 4 business days, at extremely reasonable rates. We chose to go with Taiyou Shuppan, which offers packaged deals at set rates, each with a few different paper or finish options (matte or glossy, coated paper or newsprint, a few weight options, etc). Even if you don’t know anything about printing or paper material, going with the recommendations will produce a nice book unproblematically.

We opted for the “Sun Bazaar PP set”, with a 220kg matte coated 4-colour cover, and 90kg black&white interiors. The inside cover pages are usually blank in doujinshi. Possible page count runs from 12 to 300 pages (including covers), we went with 34 (9 story pages+21 sketch pages).
Printers generally accept almost every file format you’d normally use – in our case, they list Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop, Corel Painter, Comic Studio (Manga Studio), Comic Works, and PDF.
For illustrator data, I was required to create outlines for all text, flatten layers, embed images and save as eps… But I didn’t check the instructions well enough so I didn’t embed the pictures, left the layers in, and handed it in as ai files. Guess what, they accepted the data anyway. They also remarked that we should’ve numbered the pages as they would not be able to guarantee page order (remedied by writing the numbers on a printout), and helped us add a little bleed to the cover, since Philip had signed it to the far left, in the bleed area.

Philip works analog, so I had him scan the images at 600dpi at the intended print size, which we’d decided on B5 (182 × 257mm). Doujinshi are usually in B5 or A5, which is 148 × 210mm. Philip wanted the option to go edge-to-edge with his art, so we added 3mm each as bleed (188 × 263 mm in total).

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I decided to letter the book in illustrator, since it helps being able to edit and resize without making the lines fuzzy or screwing things up. Scott McCloud ‘s tutorial on lettering in illustrator gave me a great entry point into the process, and most of the balloons are done in the way Scott suggests (except the ones for the villain, which felt like they needed a different brush stroke). Unfortunately I couldn’t find good custom fonts in time, so that is definitely something to keep in mind for the next one.

Note that dialogue is usually lettered vertically in Japanese, and right to left. It helps to leave a bit of additional vertical space when laying out the page. Additionally, the art or dialogue should not go too close to the “throat” of the book, so I tried to keep at least 1cm free from the inside edges. We had the book square bound (no staples), so this was extra important. (I got very, very close to failing to do this)

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Doujinshi are also expected to have a section for the small print at the very end of the book, including contact info (twitter handles or websites are fine for this), copyright declaration, and (usually) the name of the printers. We included a line that says “do not reproduce without permission,” as well as a thank you message to the reader, Philip’s wife, and, well, me for helping get it done.

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The printers specialized in doujinshi are extremely accommodating to artists’ needs. The deadline for data was on Tuesday morning, or even afternoon if delivered in person. Books are then scheduled to be delivered directly to the event, an immense perk of using a doujinshi-specialized printer! Payment is usually done via bank transfer, but recently a lot of places have started accepting credit cards (the one we used accepts them if you show up in person, which was very practical).

When we arrived at the venue around 10am (about an hour before the event kicked off), the books had been safely delivered directly to our booth, and were waiting beneath our table. Amazingly efficient!

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If we’d opted for another printer, we would’ve had the options of carrying them ourselves (a lot of people do this with a simple wheel carrier, kind of like a suitcase without the shell), or having them sent to the temporary Yamato station at the venue – be warned, there is always a long line for this one.

For Comitia and Comiket, creators are required to hand in a sample of each book, and have it checked for content (mostly important for pornographic books). International Manga Festival does not have this requirement, so we were set to sell it right away.

Contrary to Comiket or Comitia, International Manga Festival is similar to a American or European convention. There’s plenty of publisher and retailer booths, a stage featuring panel discussions, and an “artist’s alley” area for individual artists. This area consists of plain tables for the artists to put their wares on, just like Comitia (which IMF is held in conjunction with).

Here’s a great video on International Manga Festival. I’m in there for about a second, see if you can spot me!

Our table was shared with a few other artists invited by Akihide Yanagi’s Amecomi Night, so there were some other products on the table, and signings scheduled (which enabled Philip to take some time off and wander the hall).

People started lining up to get Philip’s book right away, and there was a pretty impressive line as soon as they noticed he was also doing sketches for anyone buying the book. Setting rules for this might be a good idea before setting up.

Comitia/International Manga Festival wraps up at 4pm (yes, it’s only 5 hours), and teardown occurs incredibly fast and efficiently. You take your stuff off the table, move out, and an hour later, the hall is completely cleared out. We had a decent amount of books left, so I packed them back into one of the boxes and carried it out to the temporary Yamato station. They have shipping slips ready, but my advice would be to grab one in the morning and have it already filled out, which would enable you to skip the line for the slips after the event is over and EVERYONE needs one.

We still have some of these books left, so I am going to try to get them up for sale on Comic Zin and other doujinshi stores. I’ll make sure to put together another post about that once it’s done!
As always, make sure to let me know if you have questions, and make sure to hit the like or reblog button if you liked this post 🙂

Philip Tan doujinshi “Garan Guard” for Kaigai Manga Festa 2014

I just got done editing my friend Philip Tan’s first-ever doujinshi, Garan Guard, to be released at International Manga Festival (aka Kaigai Manga Festa) in Tokyo this weekend.
9 all-new story pages scripted and drawn by Philip, plus 21 old and new sketches and commissions, color cover, square bound, to be sold for 1,000 Yen!
If you’re in the area, make sure to stop by Tokyo Big Site, East Hall 4. Booth number is D-09!

いよいよ今週末開催の海外漫画フェスタ(Comitia110内、東京ビッグサイト東4ホールにて)に向けて、フィリップ・タン先生の同人誌を作りました。

タン先生初の完全オリジナル書き下ろし漫画が9ページ、その上スケッチや過去のコミッション絵が21枚と豪華な内容になりました!1,000円の予定です。 タン先生本人ももちろん手売りとサインします。
とてもフレンドリーな方なので遠慮せず話しかけてください!
海外漫画フェスタ、アーティスト・アレイ内のスペース番号D-09だそうです。
ご来場の方は是非お立ち寄りください!000表紙003004016019

Philip Tan doujinshi “Garan Guard” for Kaigai Manga Festa 2014

I just got done editing my friend Philip Tan’s first-ever doujinshi, Garan Guard, to be released at International Manga Festival (aka Kaigai Manga Festa) in Tokyo this weekend.
9 all-new story pages scripted and drawn by Philip, plus 21 old and new sketches and commissions, color cover, square bound, to be sold for 1,000 Yen! If you’re in the area, make sure to stop by Tokyo Big Site, East Hall 4. Booth number is D-09!

いよいよ今週末開催の海外漫画フェスタ(Comitia110内、東京ビッグサイト東4ホールにて)に向けて、フィリップ・タン先生の同人誌を作りました。

タン先生初の完全オリジナル書き下ろし漫画が9ページ、その上スケッチや過去のコミッション絵が21枚と豪華な内容になりました!1,000円の予定です。
タン先生本人ももちろん手売りとサインします。とてもフレンドリーな方なので遠慮せず話しかけてください!海外漫画フェスタ、アーティスト・アレイ内のスペース番号D-09だそうです。ご来場の方は是非お立ち寄りください!

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Weekend Doujinshi Review, 2014/11/9

Another weekend, another self-published manga review. Make sure to check the doujinshi tag for previous installments!

This time around, I am introducing one book from Comitia 109, plus one that I got at Comic Zin. I thought you might enjoy some relaxing reads to recover from last week’s Halloween special

1. That is not love by Juzo Kirisawa* (Circle: Kinokotou)

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After a brief break,this is another one of the doujinshi I got at Comitia 109. (Only two weeks til 110!!)
Comitia 109 circle thumbnail:

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That is not love (interesting, the thumbnail calls it “This is not love”)  is part of a series about a geek from the country making his way through art school in Tokyo, his unrequited love for his cousin, and the gap between otaku and regular people (?).

Art student Kiichi is back home in Hiroshima over the holidays. The book opens with Kiichi being quizzed about his life in Tokyo (love life in particular) by his uncle at a family gathering. His cousin Mokko (this is probably a nickname but the only reference to her in the book) interrupts the interrogation, but quickly gets her own share when the uncle starts plotting to find her a husband in turn.

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That is not love continues to depict Kiichi’s time in Hiroshima at a leisurely pace, including a skype call to a friend’s and a phone call with possible love interest Nakayama back in Tokyo, leading to the deduction that there’s not really much to do in the small town, except for the upcoming fireworks festival… Which gets canceled due to a rainstorm.

IMG_20141109_0003The book closes with Mokko coming to meet Kiichi at the train station, just as he is about to head back to Tokyo, and the romantic tension just keeps on coming…

That is not love is a 26 page A5 book with a glossy color cover. As the color illustration suggests, it is a very laid-back, slice-of-life story without any huge events or resolution, but does a good job of conveying the characters’ emotional states.
The art is just gorgeous and left in pencil uninked, giving it a raw quality that I felt really added to the slowlife atmosphere of the book.

The artist:  on Twitter, pixiv
Juzo Kirisawa’s works on Comic Zin
*note: I am using names in their native (family->given) order, unless the artist is specifically using a different one. In this case, the artist’s name is alphabetized in the given->family order on the book.
Some of Kirisawa’s books are available on Amazon, so I’m going to embed a product widget here too. In case it doesn’t show, try turning off any ad blockers you have installed, or just go to Amazon.co.jp and search for 桐沢十三 .

2 Tirol and the Dragon on Scary Mountain by Kurusu Tatsuya (circle: Ponz)

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In a village where humans and spirits live together harmoniously, little elf girl Tirol is leading a simple life with her grandfather. One day, he tasks her with finding and slaying a dreadful dragon that has been posting on elves and animals in the region.

As she proceeds on the path toward the mountain, Tirol meets several animals, all quivering in fear as soon as they year that she’s heading for the mountain, but she assures them she’ll be fine, as she has learned some magic from her grandfather.

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At long last, Tirol reaches the dragon’s lair, and finds that, while huge and fearsome, the beast is quite reasonable. Why is eating elves and animals such a horrible thing, he asks, after all you eat pigs and cattle, don’t you?
Tirol ends up learning a lesson about the circle of life, and returns home with a better understanding of the food on her table, and its value.

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Tirol and the Dragon is laid out like a children’s storybook, with a single image on each page, accompanied by a block of text with very little Kanji. It reads very much like a fairytale, especially when Tirol meets the talking animals and learns a little more about the dragon from each of them. The story’s resolution is also very reminiscent of any number of fairytales, and the whole package is not only suitable, but downright geared towards children – this would make a fantastic book to read with a small child.

That’s not to say it’s not an attractive book for grownups – after all I purchased it immediately when I saw it at Comic Zin. The art, with very precise and purposeful pen strokes, it’s absolutely gorgeous, and the cover is printed on fantastic textured canvas stock. I would’ve loved to see the cover in color, but I get the feeling the artist left it in black & white on purpose, almost like a coloring book for children.
Tirol and the Dragon is B5 sized, and 24 pages. It’s 300 Yen at Toranoana or Zin, and that’s an absolute steal for such a gorgeous package.

The artist: Kurusu Tatsuya on Twitter, the web.
Tirol and the Dragon from Scary Mountain on Toranoana and Comic Zin

That’s it for today! Hope you enjoyed the read.
In for more? Make sure to check the doujinshi tag for books I have previously reviewed.

As always, I welcome feedback and interaction, so I’d be happy if you liked/reblogged, or even commented. Questions and suggestions are welcome!

Special Halloween Edition Doujinshi Review

I know, I know. I’m late to the party. Halloween is not usually a big thing for me, since I’m from central Europe. But I made a trip to Roppongi on Friday to see the lifesized Patlabor Ingram (which was super cool, but unfortunately already getting prepped for transport and I didn’t get a good look at it), and the streets were flooded with people in flashy Halloween costumes, so it gave me an idea. Why not do a Halloween-themed doujinshi review?

So I made a short trip to Melonbooks and Lashinbang in Omiya yesterday to specifically look for books with Halloween-ish content. I expected to find a lot of cute witches, ghosts, and possibly some horror content, although I wasn’t sure whether the big stores would be stocking the heavy stuff.
But lo and behold, the first thing I found was this:

IMG_20141103_00011. Kuwareru (being devoured) by Nagomiyasan (Suzuki Nago)

Kuwareru‘s protagonist is a regular Joe, down on his luck: on the very first page, his wife files for divorce, and her lawyer reads him the conditions for meeting their adorable daughter Yukari.
A few days later, he is spending some time with Yukari, and we get the feeling that her innocent smile just might be his salvation, when suddenly he passes out and awakes to…

IMG_20141103_0003Chained to the wall in a barren room, the protagonist finds himself face to face with a huge, savage-looking monster that looks like straight out of Attack on Titan.
Both of them are bound by chained linked to the wall by a timed lock, the last one holding the monster down being set to 15 minutes earlier than the protagonist’s. Next to where he’s sitting, he finds a rusty knife, and binoculars, while the beast on the other end seems to be surrounded by human body parts from multiple victims.

He remembers a similar scene in a horror film, where the main character ended up cutting off their own foot to survive, but quickly dismisses the idea since the knife doesn’t look nearly sharp or strong enough to amputate anything… So he does the understandable thing: He freaks the fuck out.

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Only afterwards does he remember that he was with his little daughter when he was apparently abducted… And things only go downhill from there.

Kuwareru is a classic locked room horror story, and while there is some gore in it, the main scare element is definitely psychological. The main character faces the realization that his life is over, not only because he is about to be dismembered by a hulking monstrosity with gigantic fangs, but because he has already lost everything – his career is stagnating, his wife dumped him, and his dearest daughter may well be dead already. It’s a no-way-out situation, and this being a Japanese story, it is safer not to hold your breath for a happy ending…

Kuwareru  is 28 pages in B5 format, with a matte 4-color cover (probably the scariest I’ve ever seen on a doujinshi). It’s a pretty standard production physically, and definitely more about the story than visuals. The art is reasonably professional, and purposefully comes apart at times when the protagonist loses it.
The original price was 400 Yen, I got it at Melon Books for 549.

The author: Suzuki Nago on Pixiv, Twitter
Kuwareru on Melonbooks

Surprisingly, I didn’t find anything else appropriate for the theme at Melonbooks. So I moved on to Lashinbang, which sells second hand doujinshi and character goods.
And there, at the opposite end of the Halloween doujinshi spectrum, I found:

2. Potoneko Halloween by Naru Nanao & KOKONOBI (circle: Ice & Choco)

IMG_20141103_0006Okay, this is something that would normally never pick up, but it was the only book I could find that actually said “Halloween” on the cover, so I just had to get it.

Poteneko Halloween is a book from 2002, and unlike the other books I have been introducing, it’s simply a collection of illustrations rather than a manga story. According to the introduction, the artists had produced a variety of goods to go with it, such as a clear file (a plastic sleeve/folder to protect loose sheets of paper) and a decorative plate.

The 6-page insides of the book are fairly similar to the cover: There is one illustration per page, with a small block of text describing the artist’s motivations for producing the respective images.

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From what I can find on the web Naru Nanao is a fairly well known games illustrator, and Kokonobi a frequent collaborator (and former assistant?). The book is full color, and printed on pretty thick stock. It was 100 Yen at Lashinbang, I assume that’s because there’s not too much content and it’s fairly old.
There’s a lot of Kancolle illustration on Kokonobi’s Pixiv profile, including one for this year’s Halloween:

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halloween! by ここのび on pixiv

The artists:

Naru Nanao on Wikipedia

Kokonobi on Pixiv, Circle profile

And finally…

3. Kaijuu Wakusei (Monster Planet) by duke

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What would Halloween be without a good Kaijuu movie?

The story is set on a distant planet inhabited by peaceful creatures. Humans invade, and start harvesting the “Kaijuu” as material for weapons and armor. When one of the beasts, a sort of plant-dragon, being herded into town for slaughter, fights back, it’s put into chains and thrown into a dungeon.

There, it encounters a young girl, who has been imprisoned for living together peacefully with the monsters.

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Soon, she is taken back outside to be crucified publicly.. Until the plant-dragon bursts out of the ground from underneath and starts attacking the soldiers torturing the girl.
The soldiers being powerless against the monster, the town’s “king” shows his true colors: He’s a Kaijuu himself, having feasted on the monsters for years.

From there on, it’s an honest-to-god monster brawl, in the vein of the best of the Godzilla movies.

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Since I got this book at Lashinbang, I didn’t get to look at the insides, and half expected it to be a collection of Kaijuu illustrations. Very pleasantly surprised that it was a proper manga, with great art and a good story. Very satisfying conclusion, too.

Monster Planet is a 44-page story in B5 format, square bound with a semi-glossy 4c wraparound cover. It was 300 Yen at Lashinbang, and well worth it I think!

The artist: duke on Pixiv, Twitter

edit: Forgot one! Here is another “illustration collection” type book by artist kr3:

4. kr+4 by kr3 (Shibano Kaito)

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A beautiful collection of witch-themed illustrations. The artist points out on the first page that he loves drawing witches, which have a fairly defined general theme. The book features 7 illustrations, including the cover, each covering a different color or element.

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There’s no text or anything, but the illustrations are gorgeous, so I feel it was a steal at 100 Yen.

The artist: Shibano Kaito on the web

That’s it for today! Hope you enjoyed this look at a few books a little different from what I usually read. Want more? Make sure to check the doujinshi tag for books I have previously reviewed.

As always, I welcome feedback and interaction, so I’d be happy if you liked/reblogged, or even commented. Questions and suggestions are welcome!